All Of Who

Is all of who correct?

You are correct, it should be “whom”. By the traditional rules, “who” is used for subjects and “whom” for objects. “Who asked the question?” “Who” is the subject, the person doing the action, so that is correct. “You asked whom?” “Whom” is the object, the person receiving the action, so that is correct.

Who all of whom all?

Both are correct. Two different ways of saying the same thing. You use “who” is a subject and “whom” as an object.

How do you use all of which?

‘ All of which can be used at the beginning of an independent sentence. See example from the Economist below: Americans overall are much more familiar with Chinese people and their cooking.

Can you start a sentence with all of whom?

Technically, that “whom” is correct because it’s the object of the verb “called.” Yet almost no one would say it that way. Does that mean everyone’s wrong? No. It means that, when the pronoun’s at the beginning of a sentence, even the most formal writing can use “who” as an object.

Is who all grammatically correct?

It is not a possessive pronoun. It is properly used when the words immediately preceding it are indefinite pronouns. The sentence “Who all is not coming?” is correct, but “Whose all is” is incorrect. You must login to add an answer.

Is many of who correct?

Is Many of Whom Correct? Yes, the phrase many of whom is correct to use whom instead of who. This is because you should use whom to refer to object of a verb or preposition. Since of is a preposition, whom is the correct pronoun to follow it.

Can you say all of?

“All” As an Indefinite Pronoun before a Determiner The “all” in “all of” is classified as an indefinite pronoun. It is perfectly acceptable to use “all of” before a determiner. For example: all of the men.

How do you use all of whom?

Whom should be used to refer to the object of a verb or preposition. When in doubt, try this simple trick: If you can replace the word with “he”’ or “’she,” use who. If you can replace it with “him” or “her,” use whom. Who should be used to refer to the subject of a sentence.

Is it who all or whom all?

Whom should be used to refer to the object of a verb or preposition. When in doubt, try this simple trick: If you can replace the word with “he”’ or “’she,” use who. If you can replace it with “him” or “her,” use whom. Who should be used to refer to the subject of a sentence.

How do you use who or whom?

The Rule: Who functions as a subject, while whom functions as an object. Use who when the word is performing the action. Use whom when it is receiving the action. Kim is an athlete who enjoys distance running.

Who is Who Who is whom?

There are a few rules when you should use who and whom. “Who” is a subjective pronoun. “Whom” is an objective pronoun. That simply means that “who” is always subject to a verb, and that “whom” is always working as an object in a sentence.

Who or whom in plural?

‘Who’ does not inflect for number: it is always ‘who’ as the subject of a clause and ‘whom’ in all other contexts, whether its antecedent is singular or plural.

How Do You Use of Which?

“Which” is the relative pronoun and “of” is a preposition placed at the beginning of the relative clause, instead of at the end. A few examples of this construction are: She discovered so many spiders, of which she was most afraid. He answered all the listening and reading exercises, of which the test mostly consisted.

How do you use most of which?

As to whether you would use “most of whom” or “most of which,” both “who” and “which” are relative pronouns. “Who” is used to refer to people, while “which” is used to refer to animals and things. For example, “I have twelve co-workers, most of whom are French, and I have twelve wine bottles, most of which are empty.”

Do you need a comma before all of which?

Senior Member As far as I know, all the Korean grammar books say that when quantity phrases such as ‘all of’, ‘both of’, ‘some of’, ‘many of’ and so on are used with relative pronoun like ‘whom’, ‘whose+noun’ and ‘which’, ‘comma’ must be used before them.

Do you put a comma after all of Which?

All of which, most of which, many of which, much of which, some of which, a few of which, a little of which, none of which, etc. Commas are added when the clause adds extra information, “nice to know”, but not essential to identifying the noun. See punctuation below.

How can I use whom in a sentence?

Examples of “whom” in a sentence:

  • He saw the faces of those whom he loved at his birthday celebration.
  • She saw a lady whom she presumed worked at the store, and she asked her a question.
  • Here dwells an old woman with whom I would like to converse.

Can I start a question with whom?

Beginning a Question: If the question can be answered with a subject pronoun (he, she, it, or they), use who or whoever. If it can be answered with an objective pronoun (him, her, or them), use whom or whomever.

Can you start a sentence with the word whom?

Just be careful, because there is an exception: There is one context in which you should always use whom: after a preposition at the beginning of a sentence or clause. For example, To whom did you address that letter? (Not “to who”). And, My teacher, for whom I’m doing some research, is currently in a meeting.

Is all of whom correct grammar?

You are correct It’s whom because of the word “of”. (It’s acting like an object, not a subject. The technical terms are “objective and subjective case.”) You would say “all of him,” not “all of he”, so whom is correct.

What does who all mean?

When some people say, “Who all are coming to the party?” they mean, “Who is coming to the party?” but they assume the answer will include more than one person.

Which is correct all whom or all who?

You are correct, it should be “whom”. By the traditional rules, “who” is used for subjects and “whom” for objects. “Who asked the question?” “Who” is the subject, the person doing the action, so that is correct. “You asked whom?” “Whom” is the object, the person receiving the action, so that is correct.

Is it grammatically correct to say with who?

The commonly repeated advice for remembering whether to use who or whom is this: If you can replace the word with he or she or another subject pronoun, use who. If you can replace it with him or her (or another object pronoun), use whom. One way to remember this trick is that both him and whom end with the letter m.

How do you use who correctly?

The Rule: Who functions as a subject, while whom functions as an object. Use who when the word is performing the action. Use whom when it is receiving the action. Kim is an athlete who enjoys distance running.

Can you say many of who?

many of whom are held back by societal barriers.” As you know, a clause has its own subject and verb. In this clause, the subject is “many,” and the verb is “are.” Don’t be misled by “of whom” in phrases like “many of whom,” “several of whom,” “most of whom,” “all of whom,” “few of whom,” “one of whom,” and so on.

What does many of whom mean?

snargleplax said: “Of whom” is a prepositional phrase modifying “many.” “Whom” is what you use instead of “who” when the word is the object of a verb or preposition. “Many of whom” is a phrase familiar to many as an idiomatic construction.

Is who have grammatically correct?

Yes, grammatically speaking, the “correct” answer is: It (who has to update his/her opinions) is you, not I. BUT over the years, native speakers have decided to make the verb agree with the subject complement: It is you (subjective complement) who have (agrees with “you”) to change your opinions, not I.

Is all of us correct?

“All of us” is certainly something you would hear, as well as “We all”. The difference is in the fact that “All us students” is incorrect because when using a personal pronoun, “of” is necessary; while “All the candy” is correct, because “candy” isn’t a personal pronoun, and thus “of” is optional.

Is all of these plural or singular?

Therefore, the expression “all this” or “all of this” cannot refer normally to a singular noun, but to a collective (list, row, pile, etc) or uncountable (water, rubbish, etc) noun. The exception is when the phrase is used for emphasis: Example 3: He built all (of) this boat himself.

Which is correct all of this or all of these?

It is better to say all these things or all these features or all these reasons. In your example, all this is more appropriate. All this can be used to refer to multiple things, even though this implies something singular. When you use all this, think of it as meaning all this stuff.

What can I say instead of all of?

all of. all,all over,altogether,clean,completely,dead,enough,entire,

How do you use many of whom?

A: It should be “whom.” The clause at the end of that sentence should read “ … many of whom are held back by societal barriers.” As you know, a clause has its own subject and verb. In this clause, the subject is “many,” and the verb is “are.”

How do you use whom in a sentence?

Whom sentence example

  • Actually, she knew very little about the man with whom she had promised to spend the summer. …
  • Whom will you send for? …
  • He saw a gentleman whom he presumed to be the director, and told him about Helen. …
  • At the porch he met two of the landed gentry, one of whom he knew. …
  • To whom did you apply?

Can you use whom with plural?

The word “whom” is a pronoun that can replace a singular or plural noun.

Who is whom or who is who?

The Rule: Who functions as a subject, while whom functions as an object. Use who when the word is performing the action. Use whom when it is receiving the action.

When should I use who and whom?

General rule for who vs whom:

  • Who should be used to refer to the subject of a sentence.
  • Whom should be used to refer to the object of a verb or preposition.

Who and whom in a sentence?

Use who when the subject of the sentence would normally require a subject pronoun like he or she. For example, “Who is the best in class?” If you rewrote that question as a statement, “He is the best in class.” makes sense. Use whom when a sentence needs an object pronoun like him or her.

Is it correct to say who all?

It is not a possessive pronoun. It is properly used when the words immediately preceding it are indefinite pronouns. The sentence “Who all is not coming?” is correct, but “Whose all is” is incorrect.

Who all want or wants?

If you mean a single person by “who” then it would be “who wants”. But if you wish to say “who all” then it would be “who all want to….”.

What do you mean at all?

At all means ‘in any way’. We use it with questions and negatives to add emphasis, but not with affirmative statements: …

What does all & all mean?

“The dog got into the fried chicken, we forgot the sunscreen, and the kids started whining at the end, but all in all the picnic was a success.” “All in all” is a traditional phrase which can mean “all things considered,” “after all,” or “nevertheless.” People unfamiliar with the traditional wording often change it to …

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