How can I treat symptoms of COVID-19 at home?

Your healthcare provider might recommend the following to relieve symptoms and support your body’s natural defenses:

• Taking medications, like acetaminophen or ibuprofen, to reduce fever
• Drinking water or receiving intravenous fluids to stay hydrated
• Getting plenty of rest to help the body fight the virus

What can I do to reduce the COVID-19 symptoms if I only have a mild disease?

Some of the same things you do to feel better if you have the flu — getting enough rest, staying well hydrated, and taking medications to relieve fever and aches and pains — also help with COVID-19.

What are some of the medications that I can take to reduce the symptoms of COVID-19?

Acetaminophen (Tylenol), ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin) and naproxen (Aleve) can all be used for pain relief from COVID-19 if they are taken in the recommended doses and approved by your doctor.

What can I do at home if I have mild COVID-19 symptoms and do not need hospitalization?

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If you have mild COVID-19 symptoms, you will likely need to manage your health at home. Follow these tips:

• If you have a fever, drink plenty of fluids (water is best), get lots of rest, take acetaminophen (Tylenol®).
• If you have a cough, lie on your side or sit up (don’t lie on your back). Add a teaspoon of honey to your hot tea or hot water (don’t give honey to children under one year old). Gargle with salt water. Call your healthcare provider or pharmacist for advice about over-the-counter, comfort care product, like cough suppressants, cough drops/lozenges. Have a friend or family member pick up any needed medicines. You must stay at home.
• If you are anxious about your breathing, try to relax. Take slow deep breaths in through your nose and slowly release through pursed lips (like you’re are slowly blowing out a candle). If you are having trouble breathing, call 911.

What are some of the mild symptoms of COVID-19?

Mild Illness: Individuals who have any of the various signs and symptoms of COVID-19 (e.g., fever, cough, sore throat, malaise, headache, muscle pain) without shortness of breath, dyspnea, or abnormal chest imaging.

Can I stay at home to recover if I have only mild symptoms of COVID-19?

Most people with COVID-19 have mild illness and can recover at home without medical care. Do not leave your home, except to get medical care. Do not visit public areas.

How long does it take to recover from COVID-19?

Fortunately, people who have mild to moderate symptoms typically recover in a few days or weeks.

How bad can a mild case of COVID-19 be?

Even a mild case of COVID-19 can come with some pretty miserable symptoms, including debilitating headaches, extreme fatigue and body aches that make it feel impossible to get comfortable.

How long does it take for COVID-19 symptoms to start showing?

People with COVID-19 have reported a wide range of symptoms – from mild symptoms to severe illness. Symptoms may appear 2-14 days after exposure to the virus. If you have fever, cough, or other symptoms, you might have COVID-19.

How long can a patient still feel the effects of COVID-19 after recovery?

Older people and people with many serious medical conditions are the most likely to experience lingering COVID-19 symptoms, but even young, otherwise healthy people can feel unwell for weeks to months after infection.

How long can you spread COVID-19 after testing positive?

People with COVID-19 can spread the virus to other people for 10 days after they develop symptoms, or 10 days from the date of their positive test if they do not have symptoms. The person with COVID-19 and all members of the household should wear a well-fitted mask and consistently, inside the home.

Are three weeks enough to recover from COVID-19?

The CDC survey found that one-third of these adults had not returned to normal health within two to three weeks of testing positive for COVID-19.

What are some of the lingering side effects of COVID-19?

A full year has passed since the COVID-19 pandemic began, and the mind-boggling aftermath of the virus continues to confuse doctors and scientists. Particularly concerning for doctors and patients alike are lingering side effects, such as memory loss, reduced attention and an inability to think straight.

Can COVID-19 leave lingering symptoms?

Older people and people with many serious medical conditions are the most likely to experience lingering COVID-19 symptoms, but even young, otherwise healthy people can feel unwell for weeks to months after infection.

What are some of the potential long-term effects of COVID-19?

Known as post-acute sequelae of SARS-CoV-2 infection (PASC), or more commonly as Long COVID, these conditions affect all ages. Long-term effects include fatigue, shortness of breath, difficulty concentrating, sleep disorders, fevers, anxiety and depression.

What are the new or ongoing symptoms of COVID-19?

People commonly report experiencing different combinations of the following symptoms: Difficulty breathing or shortness of breath. Tiredness or fatigue. Symptoms that get worse after physical or mental activities (also known as post-exertional malaise)

What are some neurological long-term side effects of COVID-19 after recovery?

A variety of neurological health complications have been shown to persist in some patients who recover from COVID-19. Some patients who recover from their illness may continue to experience neuropsychiatric issues, including fatigue, ‘fuzzy brain,’ or confusion.

What are some symptoms of COVID-19 long haulers?

Those individuals are often referred to as “COVID long-haulers” and have a condition called COVID-19 syndrome or “long COVID.” For COVID long-haulers, persistent symptoms often include brain fog, fatigue, headaches, dizziness and shortness of breath, among others.

Which organ system is most often affected by COVID-19?

COVID-19 is a disease caused by SARS-CoV-2 that can trigger what doctors call a respiratory tract infection. It can affect your upper respiratory tract (sinuses, nose, and throat) or lower respiratory tract (windpipe and lungs).

Can COVID-19 cause other neurological disorders?

In some people, response to the coronavirus has been shown to increase the risk of stroke, dementia, muscle and nerve damage, encephalitis, and vascular disorders. Some researchers think the unbalanced immune system caused by reacting to the coronavirus may lead to autoimmune diseases, but it’s too early to tell.

How can COVID-19 affect your brain?

Boldrini explains her research on the psychiatric symptoms seen in COVID-19 patients. The disease may be best known for its ability to rob people of their breath, but many patients report an array of cognitive and psychiatric issues — memory lapses, fatigue and a mental fuzziness that became known as brain fog.

Are neurological symptoms of COVID-19 seen in the feet?

Some neurological symptoms in the lower limbs and feet have also been noted amongst COVID-19 patients, with Guillain-Barré Syndrome occurring in those aged over 60 in particular.